5-4-3-2-1 rub

Although there are many stories and different quantities, I’ve managed to start to enjoy the simplicity and versatility of the following rub. I’ve initially made it for spare ribs, but it’s also great with some burgers or even on chicken, although don’t use too much.

How to make this gorgeous and easy rub, you ask? Well, let me surprise you.

What you need is the following spices.

  • 5 tablespoons of brown sugar
  • 4 tablespoons of paprika powder. The mild one, please….
  • 3 tablespoons of sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons of grounded pepper, preferably the lemon kind
  • 1 tablespoon of garlic powder.

Once you read this, I’m sure you can figure out the name of the rub itself. Love it!

Of course, you can choose any amount you desire, just keep the differentiation in the amounts the same. 5-4-3-2-1 could be kilos, pounds, stone, tons, or whatever other unit you use wherever you’re from. Enjoy!

Beercan Burgers, yet once again.

it’s been some time since I made these, but they are still soooo easy and definitely one of my favorites. Beercan Burgers (or made with a coca cola can, but it’s probably size that matters 😉 ).

You just need a few things for 2 of these big boys.

  • 300 grams of minced meat (in my case 100% pure beef)
  • 1 egg
  • bread crumbs
  • ketchup
  • 5-4-3-2-1 rub (but any good rub will do)
  • bacon (long slices)
  • chedar cheese (the chewy melty kind of cheap cheese)
  • some grated cheese of a kind
  • 1 red onion
  • 1 green bell pepper (but any colour will do, of course)
  • BBQ Sauce

First start by making the minced meat ready for the can… Mix the minced meat, the egg, a squish of ketchup, a dash or rub and the bread crumbs to a non-stick, non-watery substance. Sounds difficult, but you know it once you’ve got your hands in it.

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I’ve divided this in 2 balls of roughly 150 grams each. Pretty nice size. Then, form balls and once done, press the beercan (or Coca Cola, for the observing people) in the center and form the minced meat neatly around it.

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Now the even more easy part, wrap it with 2 or 3 slices of bacon until it’s nicely packed.

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Now it’s back to cutting up some veggies and making them soft in a pan. You can of course use the BBQ for that too, but mine is not lit yet, so I’ll use the stove for now.

The bell pepper and unions are cut up and softened and I’ve also added a cloaf of garlic. Never hurt anyone. (almost …. depends, I guess, of the situation…)

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Once soft, let cool down, before you put it in the burgers, of course. I’ve also sliced up a few pieces of cheese, due to the lack of grated cheese here on sunday and no open stores around for miles ….

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Now I’ve added some very little vegetables (cold!) in the burgers and some cheese and I’ve repeated this until it was full, topped of with …. more cheese.

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Now a squeeze of BBQ sauce, mine is ‘sweet baby ray’s’, Hickory and brown sugar. Some sweet touch. I like it, but it’s up to your taste too, of course. You can very easily chop down some peppers in there. Everything you like. Mushrooms will do great too, but I didn’t have any ….

I’ve prepped the grill for indirect grilling on roughly 160 degrees and I’ ve placed my 2 beauties on the grill rack. 45 long minutes of waiting without looking might stress you out, but no fear, all will be well. Just mind the temperature. That’s the most important one.

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After about 30 – 35 minutes I’ve topped them off with a slice of cheddar melting cheese and let it go for the last 15 minutes.

But know, that after 45 minutes of pure agony, you will be left with 2 of those gorgeous pieces of meat and vegetables. You can’t find a better burger anywhere! I’ve ate them with some home made DO bread, and it was delicious! Definitely worth a try!

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Baking bread in the Dutch Oven

Here’s something I’ve not done for some time. Baking bread. It’s a terrible rainy sunday here now, and I’m bored. Bored onto the point that I’m going to cook. Not that I have to be bored to do so, but it does help me get my mind of things.

For the bread dough I’ve used the following.

  • 500 grams of flower
  • 350 ml of handwarm milk
  • 1 tablespoon of salt
  • 1 bag of dried yeast.

I’ve abused my little kitchen appliance to do some first mixing of the dough. All dried ingredients are in there and I’ve mixed them up pretty well.

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After this, I’ve continued by hand, adding some more flower to make it less sticky until the substance was just right.

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I’ve let it stand for 20 minutes and gave it a new good run-through. It ended up fine and I’ve cut it up into smaller pieces and made balls of it. Now place them in the DO and let it go for about an hour or 1,5. Meanwhile don’t forget to lite some coals, of course ;-).

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IMG_3118After some time (in my case about 60 minutes, but that’s due to rain here and some missing heat), I’ve added about 7 coals under the DO and some 15 on top. Let it go and don’t look, cause the most important rule is still; “If you’re looking, you ain’t cooking”.

 

Finalized product is gorgeous and great to taste! Now let’s add some meat to this bread!

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